PLASTIC

Discussion in 'Current Affairs & Debate' started by Sheena, May 30, 2018.

  1. Sheena

    Sheena MAKE IT QUICK, LUCILLE!

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    So, with all the recent FANDANGO about plastic in the sea, I've become semi-obsessed with becoming an eco-warrior. Ok, not strictly true, but I've realised that I really do want to make a difference in my life, considering the amount of plastic we get through- unpacking a weekly shop and taking fruit and veg out of plastic almost creates a binful in this house and I earn enough money to be able to shop locally and source alternative green bits and bobs.

    Has this affected anyone else? What are you doing?
     
  2. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    I'm not sure that I'm DOING much yet, other than avoiding straws. But I do feel much more aware around plastic waste. Cognitive dissonance, I suppose.

    It does feel a little to me that we have been concentrating on recycling for too long, rather than not creating crap in the first place.
     
  3. Mats

    Mats User

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    I’m by no means a zealot but I do what I can, ie make sure it goes into recycling. authorities and scientists can take it from there

    I pretty much get all my veg from the local bazaar where I can buy piece by piece rather than 2-3 kgs of carrot which I can never get through anyway before the rot sets in. more shops have adopted the pay by weight method of grains and pulses in order to cut down on plastic packaging but I’m not quite there yet

    I guess for supermarkets the challenge is to invent something that has the benefits of plastic, a massive advantage is it keeps foods fresher for longer and avoids waste. paper doesn’t
     
  4. Indie

    Indie REMAIN INDOORS

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    I've stopped getting my entire weekly shop at the supermarket and I go to the greengrocers and butcher's for their respective bits. The butcher's has a little bit of plastic but not as much as the hard plastic trays you get meat in at the supermarket.

    Mind you, I'm not necessarily doing it for the plastic benefit. More quality/price/choice/being middle class.
     
  5. Mats

    Mats User

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    my coop chain is taking measures to find alternative packaging for 4,000 products so I guess I’m happy about that
     
  6. ameraal

    ameraal huzzah!

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    i am often astounded by the amount of rubbish i generate especially considering i am a household of one. it's mindboggling.
    my biggest offence is eating take away almost every day which means far too much plastic.

    apart from that i'm pretty good - i don't really buy a lot of food that comes in plastic/metal/glass packaging. apart from fruit and vegetables i only really buy stuff like tea, mayo/pesto and ice cream and the occasional yogurt and i have a lovely fabric shopping bag.
     
  7. Mats

    Mats User

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    personal finances really have a lot to say in the matter as being eco friendly generally is the more expensive choice. I think that’s a point that a lot of politicians, NGO’s and well-meaning civilizians are missing when they’re out preaching. conscious consumerism is very much a class issue...
     
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  8. Ag

    Ag User

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    I have so much to say about recycling. Long time fan. It can be really satisfying but also as limiting as your budget. I would love to food shop elsewhere than a supermarket, for a multitude of reasons (eg quality, experience, environment etc) but I'm just not that well off.

    We have a three bag a fortnight rubbish limit here so we've been forced to up our recycling game.

    In terms of plastic I still use straws to protect my teeth. Paper ones are shit. I am thinking of investing in a bamboo one.
     
  9. RaspberrySwirl

    RaspberrySwirl Leftover

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    Single men households are apparently the biggest generators of plastic waste and the likes. For the reasons you mentioned. I never cook which means a lot of takeaway and grocery shopping almost everyday which means tons of rubbish.

    I recycle as much as possible and I’ve bought a fabric totem bag to carry groceries in instead of plastic bags.
     
  10. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    Spending time travelling between home and Mr L's mother's house, I've been mixing up the shops I use a fair bit. Near hers there is still a proper local high st with indie butchers and greengrocers, and for fruit and veg I'd say it's cheaper as a whole. Not really used the butcher enough to form a comparison.

    For me it's more of a convenience/time thing rather than cost. I must have about a dozen supermarkets (if you include Tesco Extra and Sainsbury's Local) around me before I hit somewhere where I could do all my shopping without relying on them.
     
  11. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    We've also just had a new zero waste food shop open. Not been yet, but the local lesbians are all positively rhapsodic.
     
  12. big ron

    big ron Nude inspector

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    We've been very aware of the level of plastic UK supermarkets use. In France there was hardly any plastic in food packaging, the single use bags in the veg section were made of vegetable material, and our plastic bin was hardly every full. (The glass box was overflowing mind)

    Since then I know Ms Ron will avoid buying anything in excessive plastic. Our biggest plastic output is plastic bottles because she insists on drinking sparkling water, I keep threatening to buy a sodastream.

    I do agree that its a lot easier to shop the alternatives if you are financially well off. Really the sensible thing would be to apply pressure to manufacturers and the government for systemic change.
     
  13. Mats

    Mats User

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    France does seem to have the balls to do this more so than other countries

    EU just proposed a ban on several single-use plastics. thank fuck Brexit Britain can still have their balloon sticks!!
     
  14. big ron

    big ron Nude inspector

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    Thats already been threatened by 2098 or some distant date. Plastic spoons will be banned but not until after the world has ended.
     
  15. Mats

    Mats User

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    that's a shame, I've been hoarding plastic sporks to use as currency in the post-apocalyptic climate
     
  16. Ag

    Ag User

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    I saw some gloomy expert on the BBC the other day pointing that it's probably too late to not fuck up the ecosystem by banning straws and cotton buds now. It made me wonder if it's all worth it.
     
  17. big ron

    big ron Nude inspector

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    Probably not, but as humans we're quite inventive when it comes to flirting with disaster, remember when we were all going to die from the ozone layer, we just about pulled that one back from the brink.

    Public sentiment just isn't strong enough for drastic action in the UK and even less so in the wider world. We'll either sort it out with plastic eating enzymes or wait until we're totally fucked and find another solution. The frustrating thing is there are so many other alternatives.
     
  18. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    We're hopelessly behind most of Europe in the UK, aren't we? I remember going to Germany nearly thirty years ago and packaging seemed more forward thinking then.

    As I said, I think all the fervour about recycling has kind of hidden the greater problem around creating crap in the first place.
     
  19. Kate

    Kate dumps like a truck

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    Heh, a friend with an eco-conscience but also a fizzy water addiction was saying the same thing at the weekend. Someone else offered her their 80s one that was gathering dust in a cupboard. Then we got onto the fact you can put wine in them...

    I'm glad I can recycle hard plastic here. I create way more recycling than rubbish. But yes, it would be nice to have less in the first place.
     
  20. big ron

    big ron Nude inspector

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    Very much so. It's amplified when you have kids. You feel such a cunt telling people off for buying presents but the reality is while the demand exists for cheap plastic crap that breaks within a day, the world will keep producing it. Not to mention the fact its probably been produced by some poor little chinese kid getting paid 2p a lifetime.
     
  21. big ron

    big ron Nude inspector

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    I want to put gravy in one.
     
  22. Mats

    Mats User

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    I now want to buy an Aqvia (same as Sodastream but made in Sweden) and make my own tonic water
     
  23. dmlaw

    dmlaw Democracy doesn't work

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    Yeah, there is the whole Israel issue if you buy a Sodastream, so you may have to choose your evil.
     
  24. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    I always felt deprived because we never had a Soda Stream. My cousin who lived up the road had one, and I was always very envious. Even more than the fact that they had a VHS video and we only had Video2000.
     
  25. Beverley

    Beverley I Don't Wanna Change A THI-ING

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    YAH. I didn't want to bring it UP. :disco:
     
  26. Indie

    Indie REMAIN INDOORS

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    In the 80's, it was a good idea, but they truly produced some vile liquid. Would you like to make your own Panda Pops at home? WOULD I?
     
  27. big ron

    big ron Nude inspector

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    Oh what?
     
  28. Gangsta Nancy Lam

    Gangsta Nancy Lam mess

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    I was at a bar recently and some girl shouted 'FUCK THE WHALES' when the barman said they didn't have straws.

    And honestly, I want to save the world, but every time I have to use one of those soggy paper abominations I relate.
     
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  29. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    There's a café here apparently using pasta straws. They insist there is no impact on flavour, other than for cola.
     
  30. Slave

    Slave User

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    I think I have become much more aware of the impact that littering (and by that I guess I mean mostly plastic) is having on the environment. Not just in things like ocean where it is affecting the wildlife, but in our every day lives. When we were in Zante last week, I was really sad that along the BEAUTIFUL coastlines, there were bottles and cans washing up against the shore. Not a HUGE amount (and probably no more than have been there for a LONG time), but enough that the raised awareness makes me actually notice it.

    I have to admit though, I can't say that my buying habits have changed at all (well, apart from using my own carrier bags). We have two recycling bins for our waste and I do my best to put everything I can into them - to the point where it's made me realise how little non-recyclable 'household waste' we actually generate.

    I think that what will most likely happen is the big takeaway stores that are already looking at their use of straws, disposable cups, etc. will be the ones that drive the change because that's where the experimentation will happen and what works for a small takeaway drink or meal will eventually work for bigger food products. I'm not really sure that at the moment the supermarket chains have much other choice other than to try and reduce what they do use.
     
  31. FetchFugly

    FetchFugly closing in again

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    I bought some reusable metal and silicone straws. The metal ones are horrible. I use the silicone ones but they feel a bit soft and sloppy.
     
  32. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    Why are the metal ones horrible? I've been thinking of getting some. It was the fiddliness of cleaning them that has put me off.
     
  33. Sheena

    Sheena MAKE IT QUICK, LUCILLE!

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    I'm considering a soda stream but a 5 minute look this morning didn't tell me I could easily make DIET TONIC, which rather defeated the point.

    Also, be careful about putting stuff in it that isn't just water- I remember a whole "Apple Juice/ Foaming Spillage" disaster from my childhood...
     
  34. Sheena

    Sheena MAKE IT QUICK, LUCILLE!

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    I have reusable plastic straws from ages ago- you just run them under the tap and you're done, no?

    I won't get rid of them as there's no point, but I probably wouldn't buy them now as they are plastic...
     
  35. FetchFugly

    FetchFugly closing in again

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    The metal ones just feel all wrong on the teeth. They do look nicer than the silicone ones, which are very child friendly in appearance, but are easier to clean as they are in two parts.
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2018
  36. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    The ones I've seen often come with very thin brushes and it all looks too fiddly.

    I was assuming if you have a sugary or milky drink then a quick rinse wouldn't be good enough, if they come with those.
     
  37. Sheena

    Sheena MAKE IT QUICK, LUCILLE!

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    To be fair, I rarely have either, but I take your point

    I've also invested in BAMBOO dental picks, which were QUITE NICE. Now I just need Oral B to start doing electric toothbrush heads and I'm sorted.

    Next week I plan to have a bash at REFILLABLE WASHING LIQUID from some VEGAN SHOP down the road...I'll REPORT BACK
     
  38. SDF

    SDF We're all Angles in Chainz

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    Oh I really like the idea of refillable washing liquid

    Plastic does bother me, but other than reusing my plastic bags and recycling, I can’t help feel that I’m compeltely at the mercy of the supermarkets.

    Second the point on the metal straws. Absolutely horrific things when they hit off your teeth.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
  39. Mats

    Mats User

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    isn't there something like a bamboo straw?
     
  40. ameraal

    ameraal huzzah!

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    i always have to make an effort not to roll my eyes when someone (who isn't a girl with lipstick) asks for a straw at the bar.
    i don't remember the last time i've used one.
     

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