Your Top 5 novels of All Time

Discussion in 'Current Affairs & Debate' started by Gavin, May 2, 2006.

  1. Gavin

    Gavin Fuck It I Love You

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    Go on! Make it a Top 10 if you wish. :geek:

    I'm needing inspiration for next trip to the shops.
     
  2. Krust

    Krust User

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    1. Stephan or Stefan Zweig - The Royal Game (and also very short since it's a novella). It's also often reffered to as the "Chess Story"
    2. Jeffrey Eugenides - The Virgin Suicides
    3. Albert Camus - The Fall (isn't this where the band got their name from?)
    4. Dave Eggers - A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius
    5. Andrew Sean Greer - The Confessions of Max Tivoli
    6. Fyodor Dostoevsky - Crime and Punishment
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2006
  3. The Secret History - Donna Tartt
    Atonement - Ian McEwan
    The Charioteer - Mary Renault
    The Odyssey - Homer
    A Passage To India - Forster
    Brideshead Revisited - Evelyn Waugh
    Cat On A Hot Tin Roof/Night Of The Iguana/The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Anymore - Tennessee Williams (plays)
    The Great Gatsby - Fitzgerald
    Cold Comfort Farm - Stella Gibbons

    All pretty obvious really...
     
  4. Gavin

    Gavin Fuck It I Love You

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    Ahhh, see thats one Camus book i've yet to get round to reading.

    Nice list!
     
  5. Krust

    Krust User

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    "vieux carré" is my favourite T. Williams play. It's also his gayest probably
     
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  6. I've never heard of that!
    ?
     
  7. Suedey

    Suedey The name is Rosé. Champagne Rosé.

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    Yuck.
     
  8. Suedey

    Suedey The name is Rosé. Champagne Rosé.

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    I've only read The Stranger by Camus and I really hated it. Made me feel really uneasy.
     
  9. Fuck RIGHT off. It's a classic.
     
  10. VoR

    VoR #Justice4JLo

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    1. Alias Grace - Margaret Atwood
    2. The Blind Assasain - Margaret Atwood (These two are VERY close, both near perfect)
    3. Mrs Dalloway - Virginia Woolf
    4. Animal Farm - George Orwell
    5. The Buddha Of Suburbia - Hanif Kureishi/High Fidelity - Nick Hornby

    I had to tie those last two. Both very light reading compared to the others, but equally joyous!
     
  11. Suomi

    Suomi User

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    'Alias Grace' IS perfect
     
  12. Krust

    Krust User

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    Great book! Also the inspiration for the Cure's "killing an arab". And he was all about finding sense and personal happiness in an absurd world. Sartre's novels on the other hand I can't read - Had to take "the reprive" down after the half.
     
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  13. Krust

    Krust User

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    I bought "alias grace" last week 2nd hand after the praise on here. Might give it a try when I'm off uni.
     
  14. VoR

    VoR #Justice4JLo

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    Actually yes, it is. Fuck it, they BOTH are.

    There's one passage in The Blind Assassain, in which Iris Chase see's her helper pick up a cupboard (or something, I forget) and in the movement realises that the his last favour to her will be to carry her coffin over his shoulder.

    I wish I had the book to hand to quote it. It's just a small incidental few lines, but it's devastating. :(
     
  15. Krust

    Krust User

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    It's one of his later plays and didn't tell anything new in terms of his key themes. but it's the only one I know that features openly homosexual scenes.
     
  16. Suedey

    Suedey The name is Rosé. Champagne Rosé.

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    Right, so, my top 10 -

    1. Sylvia Plath - The Bell Jar
    2. James Joyce - A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
    3. George Orwell - Nineteen Eighty-Four
    4. Oscar Wilde - The Picture of Dorian Gray
    5. Anthony Burgess - A Clockwork Orange
    6. Gabriel Garcia Marquez - A Hundred Years of Solitude
    7. Leo Tolstoy - Anna Karenina
    8. John Steinbeck - The Grapes of Wrath
    9. Harper Lee - To Kill a Mockingbird
    10. Emily Bronte - Wuthering Heights
     
  17. Suedey

    Suedey The name is Rosé. Champagne Rosé.

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    So? Doesn't mean I have to like it. Forster was a right wanker and his writing reflected that.
     
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  18. VoR

    VoR #Justice4JLo

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    I really MUST get around to reading 'The Bell Jar'. It's so me.

    Suedey, have you read any Atwood? I'm sure you'd ADORE her....
     
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  19. Suedey

    Suedey The name is Rosé. Champagne Rosé.

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    My list is quite English Lit cliche init. Oh well I don't care.
     
  20. Suomi

    Suomi User

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    hmm...i read "War and Peace" and seriously felt as if i deserved a medal for ploughing through...so utterly boring that my well intended plan of reading "Anna Karenina" next was put to rest
     
  21. Suedey

    Suedey The name is Rosé. Champagne Rosé.

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    I haven't.. but the way you lot go on about it.. well, I just ordered it off Amazon marketplace.

    The Bell Jar is far from being one of the best written novels of all time. Far far from it, in fact. But it's definitely my favourite. I must have read it over ten times.
     
  22. VoR

    VoR #Justice4JLo

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    Yay! Which Atwood have you ordered?
     
  23. So you do like it? I think the book has a perfect narrative voice. I don't know much about Forster but wanker or not he was a great writer.
     
  24. Krust

    Krust User

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  25. Suedey

    Suedey The name is Rosé. Champagne Rosé.

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    I don't, no. But then I read that book about.. ooh, ten years ago when I was actually considering doing English literature instead of dentistry as a career choice but let's not get into that.

    So anyway I read so many books during that period and out of it 3 people emerged as being wanker writers that I never, ever want to read again: Forster, Hemingway and Hardy. Hemingway in particular makes my blood boil. If I have another conversation with someone who goes on and on about The Old Man and the Sea I will fucking break something I swear.

    Sorry for the rant.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2006
  26. Suedey

    Suedey The name is Rosé. Champagne Rosé.

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    Alias Grace. That's the one you boys keep talking about, no?
     
  27. Suomi

    Suomi User

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    excellento!
     
  28. VoR

    VoR #Justice4JLo

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    Yes, that's definitely the place to start! I was worried you might have started with The Blind Assassain cos I was just talking about it. It's just as good, but it's kind of her 'Boys For Pele'. Genius, but not a starting point.
     
  29. Suedey

    Suedey The name is Rosé. Champagne Rosé.

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    Well just bear in mind that when it comes to books I'm far harsher a critic than music. The concept of guilty pleasure is nonexistent and anything that's poorly written or cliched gets binned immediately.
     
  30. VoR

    VoR #Justice4JLo

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    Poor writing and cliche are the very ANTITHESIS of what Atwood is about, don't you worry.....
     
  31. Suomi

    Suomi User

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    Without giving too much away, I reckon Suedehead's favourite character in "AG" will be Simon's mother.


    He's just the TYPE
     
  32. Hemingway was an utter cunt and is overrated I feel, but he's got some masterful stuff out there. His short stories are the best. All the "code hero" stuff is really annoying.
     
  33. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    Picking five would take more time than I'm willing to give it right now, but I'll name three that I can think that take no thought at all.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  34. Beverley

    Beverley I Don't Wanna Change A THI-ING

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    The Catcher in the Rye and The Bell Jar would definitely be in my list, as would Memoirs of a Geisha.

    Apart from that, I've been in love with Beloved by Toni Morrison ever since I read the first chapter. I'm sure there are also a few more that would be on my list. I just need to think of them.
     
  35. Gavin

    Gavin Fuck It I Love You

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    I found The Catcher In The Rye infuriating. Rambling, inane and indulgent. People tell me thats the point but even forgiving in that context, its still tedious.

    Most probably my nomination for most overrated book ever.
     
  36. lolly

    lolly Rowena? From Kuwait?

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    I read it first as a teenager and return to it every five years or so.
     
  37. Quandary

    Quandary User

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    I haven't read that much English novels, but the ones I adored were:

    J.D.Salinger - The Catcher In The Rye (I do believe reading this as a teenager had an extra effect. I was exactly 16. It's adventurous, brutal and sympathizeable)

    Sylvia Plath - The Bell Jar

    Jeffrey Eugenides - The Virgin Suicides(I tried Middlesex but found it too long and stopped halfway :shy: )

    I'm hoping to do some summer reading, so if anyon can recommend something I may like? :angel: The Summer Book sounds like a fabulous choice already!
     
  38. Jimmy

    Jimmy User

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    I'm not sure if I've read five novels. Anyway, of all the 'classic' ones I've read, like Dickens and Lord of the Flies I wouldn't really reccomend you buy them. I'd rather read a NICE MURDER.
     
  39. Beverley

    Beverley I Don't Wanna Change A THI-ING

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    Oh and self indulgent as it is, I have very fond memories of reading Prozac Nation by Elizabeth Wurtzel.
     
  40. VoR

    VoR #Justice4JLo

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    Did you know there's a film of that with Oprah Winfrey & Thandie Newton?

    I haven't seen so I don't know if it's any good....
     

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